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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
day of his visit to afghanistan, for nato's silk -- for nato soldiers were killed. which all begs -- which all begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? >> british troops drop in. it's an area the taliban used to control. no longer. nato is pushing out. that is what you can do when 10,000 british troops have been reinforced by 20,000 americans. so far, the british soldiers have not run into any opposition. usually when the insurgents see nato coming in strength, they retreat. but not always. so no one takes any chances. afghan police lead the searches. nato believes afghan candy -- afghans can deal with their own people better than foreign troops. by 2015, the idea is they will do it alone. one of the villagers hope things will improve without the insurgents around. >> the taliban steals food. i'm very poor. if i protest, they say you support nato. >> this is what progress lookalike in afghanistan. so much so, there is to be a further cut in british troops with a few hundred soldiers. but native troops still far outnumber the afghan troops. what is needed to ha
is not on the table. in afghanistan, forces have handed over security to the afghan police and the army. the handover ceremony took place with the british officers have been since 2006. this is one area gradually placed under government control. our defense correspondent was at the ceremony and filed this report. >> a moment of national pride. afghans taking responsibility for their own security. this ceremony showing that they are up for the job. but the british soldiers still have concerns, about corruption within the afghan police. >> some allegations of corruption, what we're trying to do is eradicate this. we are trying to push the locals away. >> even if afghanistan routes out the corruption, -- this is another province that was just handed over. there has been little fighting here, over the past 10 years. >> bombs and bullets are not the biggest killers, this is diarrhea and malnutrition. >> after the withdrawal of the nato forces -- >> the pressure is on the government to win the trust of its own people. >> there'll be lots of questions and concerns. our hope is to change that institution. >>
the british people deserve a deadline. we have been in helmand province since 2006, in afghanistan since early 2001. i believe the afghan government, the afghan people, the afghan army deserve to have a deadline so they can plan properly towards a transition. >> so, it is over to the afghan forces. in the village, the police seem willing to help themselves to food, just like the taliban. we did find the taliban ammunitions-in a melon patch -- ammunition stash in a melon patch. the soldiers have not gone away. they were sniping on a mission that we joined. there is still a big problem with corruption. the question now, will the afghans be able to do the job the british soldiers have been doing as they start to leave? >> for more on these challenges and calls for an even quicker drawdown of u.s. troops, i spoke earlier with a former adviser to the u.s. military in afghanistan. so, seth, have david cameron asking the taliban to stop fighting, put down their weapons, join the political process. what do you think the chances are that might happen? >> there are elements of the taliban and other insu
afghan policemen have been killed in southern afghanistan. attack happened in lashkar, an area due to be handed over to afghan control later this week. it also coincided with the departure of america's top commander, general petraeus, who is leaving to become head of the cia. u.s. marine corps general john allen will take over command of the nato-led forces in afghanistan. the crew of the space shuttle "atlantis" has said a final farewell to colleagues on board the international space station. "atlantis" will undock early on tuesday and is aiming to land back on earth on thursday. its four career members floated through the lock ready for the last trip of the shuttle program. in libya, the struggle continues between pro and taken qaddafi forces with rebels claiming they've retain control of the key oil town of brager. according to a rebel spokesman, the bulk of qaddafi's troops retreated westward. at the same time, rebels in the western city say they're preparing for fresh offensive. outgunned by qaddafi's better equipped forces, they're being forced to find creative ways to arm th
together in afghanistan as the u.s. agreed to pull out its troops. hillary clinton praised the recent resumption of talks between india and pakistan. >> we think this is the most promising approach to encourage both sides to build more confidence between them and work to implement the kinds of steps that will demonstrate the improved atmosphere that is so necessary for us to deal with the underlying problem of terrorism. >> she also said that terrorism was on everyone's minds following last week's bombing of mumbai which killed 20 people. the attack revealed once again the vulnerability of the indian cities and the police who are investigating. the security agencies should work closer together to prevent future attacks. the focus of the next page of the visit will be on business and the economy. hillary clinton is leaving delhi and is moving south where she will be visiting a factory. all of this going to show how important india has become to the u.s. and the fact is the relationship between these countries have never been warmer than they are today. >> in london, the preparations ar
are investigating the case of james phillips and, killed in afghanistan. according to his father, e-mail messages he received after his death had been read. he suspects, by hackers. >> they should suffer whatever punishment is appropriate. i'm sure that will happen. it is going to take time. >> rebecca brooks, picture leading news international tonight. criminal investigation, public inquiries. the scrutiny of what went on at her newspaper could continue for years. >> for more on today's news, i'm joined from london by author and journalist peter preston who was the editor of the guardian for a number of years. if i could start, could you explain to viewers around the world and here in the united states just how big a deal this story is and the latest developments art? >> it was all about celebrities. it was difficult to get the public engaged in that. this week, when it was revealed that the telephone of the 13- year-old murder victim had been packed into and a whole variety of other car stories -- hacked into, and a whole variety of other horror stories emerged, now you have a toxic image for the
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)